2020-2021 Course Catalog

Our academic program and offerings aim to develop a coherent, integrated understanding of truth through communal inquiry and critical thought. To accomplish this end, students study the liberal arts in courses designed around concepts, essential questions, and transferable understandings. These concepts, essential questions, and transferable understandings are grounded in the metanarrative of Creation, Fall, Redemption, and Restoration with a recognition that this story pervades and shapes the subject areas taught as well as the teachers and students who teach and learn.

Middle School Course Information

Levels of Curriculum

List of 2 items.

  • College Preparatory (CP)

    Students in grades 6-8 must be able to perform at an appropriate grade level that will prepare them for future college course work. These address similar concepts and skills as the honors courses. Good study skills, maturity, and the ability to do independent work are necessary.
  • Honors (Hon)

    Students in grades 6-8 must have previous teacher’s approval to enter an honors course, as well as a B grade average or better in the subject area. Students must demonstrate advanced ability in both critical and conceptual thinking. Concepts will be explored in greater depth and often at a quicker pace than in College Preparatory classes. In history and English, students should have demonstrated advanced skill in reading and writing and be prepared for greater demand in reading quantity and complexity of text. In science and math classes, students should have demonstrated advanced skill in problem-solving and analytical ability and be prepared for greater demand in complexity and pace of instructional concepts.

High School Course Information

Selecting Your Course of Study

Our core curriculum requirements provide a foundation for study in the liberal arts, and students are able to build on this foundation by selecting from a range of flex credits and elective offerings that will cultivate their unique gifts and potential in both depth and breadth. While minimum graduation requirements are outlined below, students are encouraged to take advantage of opportunities for growth and challenge as part of stewarding their time and resources with wisdom and discernment. Academic Counselors provide individualized guidance to students based on student giftings, passions, and plans for the future. For questions about course offerings and appropriate choices, please contact your Academic Counselor.

Levels of Curriculum

List of 4 items.

  • College Preparatory (CP)

    Students in grades 8-12 must be able to perform at an appropriate grade level that will prepare them for future college course work. These address similar concepts and skills as the honors courses. Good study skills, maturity, and the ability to do independent work are necessary.
  • Honors (Hon)

    Students in grades 8-12 must have previous teacher’s approval to enter an honors course, as well as a B grade average or better in the subject area. Students must demonstrate advanced ability in both critical and conceptual thinking. Concepts will be explored in greater depth and often at a quicker pace than in College Preparatory classes. In history and English, students should have demonstrated advanced skill in reading and writing and be prepared for greater demand in reading quantity and complexity of text. In science and math classes, students should have demonstrated advanced skill in problem-solving and analytical ability and be prepared for greater demand in complexity and pace of instructional concepts. Courses are weighted at 4.33 on a 4.0 grade scale.
  • Dual Enrollment (DE)

    We have two categories of courses that can be taken for dual enrollment: on campus through Covenant College, or online through Dordt University. On-campus dual enrollment courses through Covenant College are available to juniors and seniors and are taught by CCS teachers who are also professors at Covenant College. Courses offered include Chemistry and Microeconomics. Students eligible for college credit will be in grades 11 and 12, have a minimum 3.0 GPA, and have teacher recommendation for the desired course. The cost of these High School courses is covered in CCS tuition, but to receive college credit, students will pay a fee of $400-$600 per semester course to the college. Specific information is available through Academic and College Counselors. Students not registering and paying for college credit with the college for these courses will receive honors level credit for the course. Courses are weighted at 4.33 on a 4.0 grade scale.

    Online dual enrollment courses through Dordt University are available to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have at least a 19 on the ACT. There is no additional fee for these courses. Specific information is available through Academic and College Counselors.
  • Advanced Placement (AP)

    Chattanooga Christian School offers advanced placement (AP) courses to juniors or seniors in English Language and Composition, English Literature and Composition, Art and Design, United States History, Statistics, Calculus, Physics, Spanish, French, and Computer Science Principles. Students who wish to enroll in AP courses must meet the following criteria: indicate commitment to advanced level studies, adequately complete advanced level prerequisites in the content area, and receive a recommendation from a current teacher and permission from the AP instructor. Students are required to take an AP examination at the end of the year, which requires an additional fee under $100. Courses are weighted at 4.67 on a 4.0 grade scale.

Typical Course Sequence

2020-2021 Course Catalog

List of 10 items.

  • English

    English 6 (CP)                                       
    Grade 6
    English 6 students read a wide variety of texts that coincide with their Eastern Civilization class. This gives meaning, richness, and context which helps students to see how literature is a product of a particular culture and time. Much of the content is focused on themes of identity and storytelling as 6th graders themselves not only seek to find their place and people at CCS but also develop more successful reading and writing strategies. Students also develop the ability to support a clear claim with strong evidence and logical reasoning in full-length essays. In their creative writing, they work to pull their reader in with rich sensory details that paint a vivid picture. We discuss our literature in small and large groups as we seek to develop habits of speaking, listening, and thinking. Students work to strengthen language skills as they imitate mentor sentences and notice and fix sentence errors in their own writing.
     
    English 6 Honors (Hon)
    Grade 6
    The students in English 6 Honors are expected to work well independently, contribute well in class discussion, and maintain an accelerated pace in terms of assignments. The standards described above inform the Honors English curriculum, and students in this course are expected to engage texts and tasks with greater depth and complexity. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 
     
    English 7 (CP)
    Grade 7
    English 7 students explore literature that reflects our study of Western Civilization, inviting dialogue and expression about the human experience. The reading selections also present a variety of “coming of age” themes. Students are challenged to read with a mature mindset of examining, discussing, and evaluating truth found in the reading. Speaking, writing, grammar, and vocabulary instruction are also central components of the course.

    English 7 Honors (Hon)
    Grade 7
    English 7 Honors explores the core content of the English 7 curriculum, but incorporates additional and alternate reading and writing. Students are expected to engage the coursework with greater depth and complexity while maintaining a rigorous pace in terms of assignments. Vocabulary is contextualized in the units of study, and grammar is taught in relation to writing. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation.

    English 8 (CP)
    Grade 8
    English 8 further develops a student’s literacy skills primarily by interacting with great works of literature. Students read, discuss, and analyze a wide range of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction from our American heritage. The literature often connects with students’ course of study in US History 8. In this class, students also follow the writing process to compose different types of essays that are connected to the literature assigned. Vocabulary and grammar are taught in the context of both reading and writing. 

    English 8 Honors (Hon)
    Grade 8
    English 8 Honors follows the English 8 curriculum, with additional reading, enrichment activities, and a strong emphasis in analytical thinking and writing skills. Students are expected to engage the coursework with greater depth and complexity while maintaining a rigorous pace in terms of assignments. Vocabulary and grammar are taught in the context of both reading and writing. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation.

    English I (CP) 1 credit
    Grade 9
    English I equips students to understand, evaluate, and construct arguments, establishing a strong foundation for students to read deeply, think critically, and write well throughout their High School study. Students explore, analyze, and discuss works of World Literature to identify the ways in which the authors’ craft reveals not only their personal values, beliefs, and perspectives, but also those of their culture. Students are taught to develop the literary skills they need to comprehend, analyze, and interpret complex texts independently. Language instruction includes some instruction on grammar and vocabulary, as well as new experiences in both academic and creative writing.

    English I Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grade 9
    English I Honors: Introduction to Global Literature broadens students' awareness of literature from cultures and time periods different from their own in order to gain more understanding of the world and of their place in it. Language instruction includes acquisition of new vocabulary, development of research skills, and new experiences in both academic and creative writing. English I Honors explores the same content as English I, with enrichment activities, alternate readings, and a stronger emphasis on analytical thinking skills in writing and discussion. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 

    English II (CP) 1 credit
    Grade 10
    Sophomore English is a study of the great literary works of Western Civilization. Students consider the essential ideas of these texts in their reading, writing, and discussion--pursuing answers to some of humanity’s most enduring questions. The principles of grammar and a continuation of vocabulary study are also a part of the course.

    English II Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grade 10
    English II Honors is a study of the great works of Western Civilization at greater depth and complexity. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 

    English III (CP) 1 credit
    Grade 11
    English III is a rigorous year of reading, writing, analysis, and discussion based on American Literature. English III students investigate the various aspects of the American experience through our nation’s literature from the Colonial Age to the present. Through both independent and collaborative work, students are expected to reach their own conclusions and interpretations. Vocabulary study and research assignments are also a major part of this course.

    English Language and Composition AP (AP) ($95-$100 AP Exam fee required) 1 credit     
    Grade 11
    AP Language and Composition is a study of the rhetorical effects of language, primarily drawn from American Literature. From the College Board: “The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments…. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.” American fiction and poetry also round out the course’s content. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 

    English IV (CP) 1 credit
    Grade 12
    English IV students read a variety of genres from World Literature including novels, memoirs, essays, poetry, and plays as a means of exploring identity and calling. From Oedipus and Job to modern memoirs, students interpret, analyze, criticize, and synthesize key themes and essential questions, demonstrating their understanding not only through discussion and summative evaluations, but also through expository, persuasive, and narrative writing. In the fall semester students will craft an autobiographical narrative essay, while in the spring they will research a contemporary problem and propose a Christian response.

    English Literature and Composition AP (AP) ($95-$100 AP Exam fee required) 1 credit
    Grade 12
    This college-level course, which prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam in literature and composition, provides an in-depth study of World Literature. Units are organized thematically, engaging in questions of identity, will and circumstance, suffering, time, and mission. Students read widely and deeply, studying works from the Classical Age to the beginning of the Postmodern Age. Students demonstrate understanding through discussion and through interpretive, analytical, and persuasive compositions. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 
  • History

    Eastern Civilization 6 (CP, Hon)
    Grade 6
    Eastern Civilization is designed to introduce 6th grade students to the study of geography and history. Students survey the history, geography, and culture of each of the following regions of the Eastern Hemisphere: North Africa and the Middle East, South Asia, the Polar Regions, North Asia, East and Southeast Asia, Australia and the Pacific Realm, and Sub-Saharan Africa. Students further develop skills in using maps, reading informational text, and writing expository paragraphs. All units of study focus on the direct relationship between geographic location and cultural developments. An honors section is available for qualified students, as determined by teacher recommendation. 
     
    Western Civilization 7 (CP, Hon)                 
    Grade 7
    Western Civilization is the study of the history and geography of the Western world. The class combines a modern look at the Western world in its present day with the history of these areas. Through the partnership of geography and history, students become aware of the mistakes, achievements, accomplishments, moral dilemmas, and hardships that have shaped the Western world. An honors section is available for qualified students, as determined by teacher recommendation. 
     
    US History 8 (CP, Hon)
    Grade 8
    The 8th grade history course is a combination of surveys and topics with emphasis on the period from European colonization through the Civil War. A distinctive feature of this course throughout is the inclusion of topics of local interest supported by appropriate field trips to nearby sites. The class incorporates lecture, internet research, electronic and verbal presentations, tests, interactive lessons, and written assignments. An honors section is available for qualified students, as determined by teacher recommendation. 
     
    Civics and Government (CP) 1/2 credit                                    
    Grade 9
    Building on their experience as 8th graders in studying US history and visiting our nation’s capital, freshmen study more deeply the development of the American republican form of government and its constitutional foundation with particular emphasis on the necessity of civic virtue and institutional arrangements, both arising out of religious conviction. One semester only. This course is required of all freshmen and may be required of transfer students.

    Economics (CP ) 1/2 credit                                                     
    Grade 9 (one-semester course)
    The purpose of this introductory, semester-long course is to understand the basic principles of economics and how to be wise stewards of God’s resources. This course focuses on understanding markets—how they function and how they have been used, abused, or ignored in history. Experiential learning and an emphasis on personal finance are integral to this course. This course is required of all freshmen and may be required of transfer students.

    Ancient & Medieval History Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grade 9 
    While this course spans thousands of years of history, a topical approach utilizing the words of ancient observers makes possible a survey understanding in addition to the development of students’ critical thinking skills. This course begins with the Bible’s declaration that the second generation of humans (Cain) built a city (prompting a question about the historicity of the Scriptures) and focuses on the following cities, their people, their customs, and their institutions: Babylon and Nineveh, Athens, Alexandria, Jerusalem, Rome, Constantinople, Mecca, Beijing, and the revival of towns and cities in medieval Europe. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 

    Modern World History (CP, Hon) 1 credit
    Grade 10
    The premise for this study of the Modern World (1500-1945) is that we live in a world profoundly shaped by ideas and events which mostly found their origin in Europe. Developments there served as a springboard for the European settlement of the Americas, the exploration of and eventual scramble for Africa, and their mostly-thwarted attempts to dominate the powerful civilizations of India, China, and Japan. European hegemony ended with the two massive world wars of the first half of the 20th century. An honors section is available for qualified students, as determined by teacher recommendation. 
     
    US History (CP, Hon) 1 credit
    Grade 11
    Every student should know the story of his homeland: its settlement over a period of centuries by Europeans (including the Spanish), enslaved Africans, and later Asians; the creation of a constitutional government in the wake of a war for independence; its near break-up over issues of slavery and states’ rights; changing views of federalism; and in the 20th century especially, the expansion of federal power and the changing role of the United States in world affairs. After a nine-week survey of the period through the Civil War, the remainder of the course is devoted to the more recent history of the past 150 years. An honors section is available for qualified students, as determined by teacher recommendation. 

    US History AP (AP) ($95-$100 AP Exam fee required) 1 credit
    Grade 11
    This course is unique in that it represents a college freshman level survey of US history. Therefore, in addition to addressing the basic objectives of the concepts in the US History course, it also emphasizes primary document research and analysis, collegiate level reading and critique, and historical essay writing. This advanced course requires at least one hour (more in some cases) of study time outside of class for every hour spent in class. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 

    Contemporary Global History (CP, Hon) 1/2 credit
    Grade 12 elective (one-semester course)
    Making sense of the world in the 21st century: a one-semester exploration of the history of the world since the end of World War II, this course explores the course and consequences of the Cold War, the progression and effects of decolonization, the spread of globalization, and the comparative influences of Islam and Christianity in the past four decades. An honors section is available for qualified students, as determined by teacher recommendation. 
  • Math

    Math 6 (CP)
    Grade 6
    Sixth grade math is a course where skills and concepts taught in elementary school are reviewed and extended to form a solid foundation, preparing students for the more abstract concepts that will come in 7th and 8th grade. Basic computational skills and concepts are reviewed and practiced with an aim toward mastery. This course is designed to improve computational and problem-solving skills and solidify foundational concepts. Topics in the course include number sense and algebraic thinking; problem-solving; measurement and statistics; whole number, fraction, and decimal operations; number theory (prime numbers, GCF, LCM, etc.); ratios and percents; and geometry.

    Math 6 Honors (Hon)
    Grade 6
    Sixth grade honors math is an advanced course that prepares the student for the study of Pre-Algebra Honors in the 7th grade. This course is fast-paced and rigorous, heavy in mathematical application. Topics include number sense, one-step equations, decimals, fractions, integers, some data analysis and statistics, ratios, proportions, percents, and some geometry. Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of 5th grade advanced math or the summer equivalent.
     
    Math 7 (CP)
    Grade 7
    Seventh grade math is a review of basic math skills and beginning pre-algebra. The course covers fractions, decimals, integers, equations, proportions, ratios, percents, and limited geometry. Various story problem-solving strategies are taught.

    Pre-Algebra Honors (Hon)
    Grade 7
    The Pre-Algebra Honors course is an advanced course that prepares the student for the study of Algebra I Honors in the 8th grade. This course is fast-paced and rigorous, heavy in mathematical application. Topics include variables, expressions, integers, solving equations, rational numbers, proportions, ratios, probability, percents, linear functions, square roots, measurements, data analysis, and some geometry. The teacher also uses the graphing calculator at various times throughout the year to enhance the curriculum. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of the 6th grade honors math curriculum.
     
    Introduction to Algebra (CP)                         
    Grade 8
    Introduction to Algebra is a course designed to bridge the gap between the concrete concepts of 6th and 7th grade math to the more abstract concepts of algebra. A variety of topics are covered including learning how to write and solve equations and inequalities, solving and graphing linear equations, simplifying expressions with positive and negative exponents, simplifying and estimating perfect and imperfect square roots, and writing and solving proportions. The teacher also uses the graphing calculator at various times throughout the year to enhance the curriculum.

    Algebra I Honors MS (Hon) 1 credit
    Grade 8 (included in High School transcript but does not affect High School GPA)
    The Algebra I Honors course is an advanced course that is a study in symbolic reasoning, functions, the use of graphs to express functions, the solving of linear equations, graphing and writing linear equations, solving and graphing linear inequalities, linear systems, properties of exponents, operations with polynomials including factoring and solving quadratics, and working with radicals. This course is fast-paced and rigorous, heavy in mathematical application. The teacher also uses the graphing calculator at various times throughout the year to enhance the curriculum. Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of Pre-Algebra Honors math or the summer equivalent.
     
    Algebra I (CP) 1 credit
    Grade 9
    This first-year High School course develops the foundations that students need for High School mathematics. Topics include a brief review of pre-algebra skills, linear equations, slope, writing and solving equations, rules of exponents, operations with polynomials, factoring, working with radicals, and solving quadratics. 

    Algebra II Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grade 9
    This course is designed to challenge students with high math capability in their study of families of functions as preparation for further study in Pre-Calculus Honors and Advanced Placement math. Topics include: solving linear equalities and inequalities, quadratics, equations with radicals, polynomials, logarithms, and rational functions. A graphing calculator is a requirement in this class (TI-83 or 84). Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of Algebra I or Algebra I Honors.

    Introduction to Algebra (CP) 1 credit
    Grade 9
    This course is designed to prepare students for Algebra I. A variety of topics are covered including learning how to write and solve equations and inequalities, solving and graphing linear equations, simplifying expressions with positive and negative exponents, simplifying and estimating perfect and imperfect square roots, and writing and solving proportions. The teacher also uses the graphing calculator at various times throughout the year to enhance the curriculum.

    Geometry (CP) 1 credit                            
    Grade 10
    Euclidean geometry topics are covered in this course. Topics include: deductive reasoning, geometry terminology, triangle properties, polygons, circles, basic right triangle trigonometry, area, volume, and proofs.

    Geometry Accelerated (CP) 1 credit                            
    Grade 10
    Euclidean geometry topics are covered in this course. Topics include: deductive reasoning, geometry terminology, triangle properties, polygons, circles, basic right triangle trigonometry, area, volume, and proofs. This course moves at a quicker pace and goes into more depth than Geometry. It prepares students for Pre-Calculus or AP Statistics and is recommended for students who anticipate further math study in college.
     
    Geometry Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grade 10
    This course is designed to challenge students with high math capability in their study of Euclidean geometry topics as preparation for further study in Advanced Placement math. The honors course emphasizes algebra and problem-solving. Topics include: deductive reasoning, triangle properties, polygons, trigonometry, area, and volume. Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of an accelerated or honors prior math class. 

    Algebra II (CP) 1 credit                                
    Grade 11
    This course is organized around the study of families of functions. It is a continuation of algebra topics from Algebra I, and emphasis is placed on linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and rational functions. Students will solve equations that include these functions. The teacher will also place an emphasis on ACT preparation in this course, including some basic trigonometry and fundamental counting principles for probability. A graphing calculator is a requirement in this course (TI-83 or 84).

    Algebra II Accelerated (CP) 1 credit                                
    Grade 11
    This course is organized around the study of families of functions. It is a continuation of algebra topics from Algebra I and addresses linear equations and inequalities, systems of equations, quadratics, polynomials, complex numbers, logarithms, introductory trigonometry, and probability. The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra and its corollaries are explored in this course. The teacher also places an emphasis on ACT preparation in this course. This course moves at a quicker pace and goes into more depth than Algebra II. It prepares students for Pre-Calculus or AP Statistics and is recommended for students who anticipate further math study in college. A graphing calculator is a requirement in this course (TI-83 or 84).

    Pre-Calculus 11 Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grades 11-12
    This course covers advanced topics needed for Calculus. Topics include: linear functions, conic sections, matrices, logarithms, advanced trigonometry, polar functions, sequences and series, and limits. The graphing calculator is a requirement for this class (TI-83 or 84). Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of honors math classes in 9th and 10th grade. Students must take either AP Statistics or AP Calculus after completion of this course. 

    Statistics (CP) 1 credit
    Grades 11-12
    This is an introductory course that focuses on data and statistical reasoning. This course aims to give students an understanding of the main ideas of statistics and useful skills for working with data. Topics include the measures of central tendency, standard deviation, probability, sampling, and various distributions. Emphasis is on experiencing statistics and the applications of statistical concepts. The graphing calculator (TI-83 or 84) is required for the course. Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of Algebra II.

    College Algebra (CP) 1 credit
    Grade 12
    This course covers algebra content and skills to prepare students for Pre-Calculus in college. Topics include various functions, designed to help those who have had two years of algebra strengthen their understanding and skill. Additional topics include conic sections, probability, and statistics. The graphing calculator (TI-83 or 84) is a requirement in this course.
     
    Pre-Calculus 12 (CP) 1 credit
    Grade 12
    This course covers advanced topics needed for Calculus in college. Students expand on material learned in Algebra II. Topics include: linear functions, rational functions, conic sections, logarithms, polynomials, advanced trigonometry, sequences and series, and probability. The graphing calculator (TI-83 or 84) is a requirement in this course. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 

    Statistics AP (AP) ($95-$100 AP Exam fee required) 1 credit
    Grades 11-12
    This AP course is very similar to a college introductory course in statistics. Students learn all topics needed for the AP test: data analysis, producing data, probability, and inference testing. The graphing calculator (TI-83 or 84) is a requirement in this course. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 

    Calculus AP (AP) ($95-$100 AP Exam fee required) 1 credit
    Grade 12
    This is a college-level calculus course that prepares students for the AP Exam for college credit. Topics include: limits, differentiation, integration, functions, and analytical geometry. The graphing calculator (TI-83 or 84) is a requirement in this course. Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and successful completion of Pre-Calculus in the junior year. 
  • Science

    Life Science 6 (CP)
    Grade 6
    Sixth grade science is designed to give students a general understanding of the concepts of life science. Students investigate the structure, function, and processes of living things as well as the similarities and differences in living organisms. Students are introduced to the human body systems and strategies for maintaining human health. Students learn to conduct scientific investigations, develop critical thinking skills, and use basic scientific tools.

    Life Science 6 Honors (Hon)
    Grade 6
    The advanced course in 6th grade prepares students for future advanced science courses by going deeper and providing more rigorous work. Topics covered include a more complex understanding of change, cycles, patterns, and relationships in the living world. Students build on basic principles related to these concepts by exploring the classification of organisms and the dynamic relationships among organisms, populations, communities, and ecosystems. The study of the human body includes biochemistry, cell structure, tissues, bones, human metabolism, a review of the systems, human genetics, and human reproduction. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 
      
    Earth Science 7 (CP)
    Grade 7
    Students are introduced to the processes of geological change. They explore the mechanisms of plate tectonics, mountain-building, earthquakes, and volcanoes. Students also study rock formations (igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic) and fossils.

    Earth Science 7 Honors (Hon)
    Grade 7
    This course provides more rigorous work and prepares students for future advanced work in science courses. Topics covered include rocks and minerals, earth’s changing surface, atmosphere and weather, oceans, natural resources, and space. Students perform and respond in writing to labs and do internet-based searches and reports. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 
     
    Physical Science 8 (CP)
    Grade 8
    The 8th grade science course is a hands-on, inquiry-based, physical science course. Topics covered include an introduction to matter, periodic table and chemical reactions, motion and forces, work and machines, and magnetism and electricity. Students perform and respond in writing to labs, do internet-based searches and reports, and do a couple of small projects during the year.

    Physical Science 8 Honors (Hon)
    Grade 8
    This class is designed to challenge students with an aptitude for both science and math and to prepare them for the next level of honors science courses. Introductory chemistry and physics are addressed from a hands-on perspective with an introduction to engineering principles and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math). Students need to be strong in math, organized, and prepared to work outside of the classroom since it is at a faster pace than regular Physical Science. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 

    Biology I (CP) 1 credit
    Grade 9
    Biology I is a general survey of introductory biology intended to give a broad view of as many topics as practical. The class time is divided between discussion of biological principles and hands-on, lab-related work. Students are exposed to the entire scope of biology today, including evolutionary concepts, presented for the sake of informed comparison. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to compare how a variety of organisms are designed to carry out the life processes by an intelligent, loving, and omnipotent Creator. Students are also encouraged to see our responsibility to creation as stewardship and delight.

    Biology I Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grade 9
    This course is designed to cover a variety of life sciences while introducing freshmen to the advanced science track in the High School. Topics include measurement, scientific method, interactions among organisms, energy, cells, development of organisms, genetics, faith and science, diversity, and anatomy. Placement in this course is decided by the science committee. Emphasis is placed on presentation of experimental results and proper techniques for obtaining them. Concurrent enrollment in Algebra II-9 is recommended, but not required. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 

    Physical Science (CP) 1 credit
    Grade 10
    Physical Science coursework focuses on fundamental concepts in the areas of physics and chemistry, while developing critical-thinking skills and the application of knowledge through hands-on labs and projects. This involves an affirmation of the scientific method and an introduction to the engineering design process. The class culminates in the final unit with a dialogue concerning the integration of faith and science and the influence that personal worldview has on our beliefs. 

    Physical Science Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grade 10
    Physical Science Honors is a course designed to introduce students to fundamental ideas associated with the process of science, basic physics concepts, and the integration of faith and science. Students learn how science fits into a reformed view of the study of the physical universe as well as what practices define scientific ways of thinking and experimenting. Students will then learn concepts related to Newton’s laws of motion, gravity, waves and sound, and light and color. The course concludes with a unit designed to help students understand how to integrate faith and science. The goal is to equip students with the ability to discern how different worldviews affect the use and understanding of scientific theories and to help them evaluate their own ideas in light of a biblical perspective of reality.

    Physics I Honors (Hon) 1 credit    
    Grade 10                                            
    In this course students work through the core concepts of physics, with a view toward preparation for Chemistry Honors DE and AP Physics. Topics include mechanics, energy, waves, thermodynamics, fluids, and atomic and subatomic physics. It is recommended, but not required, that students have completed Algebra II-9 before enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 

    Chemistry (CP) 1 credit
    Grade 11
    The Chemistry course is a college-prep level course. It deals with the composition, structure, and interactions of matter. Topics covered are the mathematics of chemistry, properties of matter, atomic structure, the Periodic Table, bonding, compounds, balancing equations/stoichiometry, and equilibrium. Students are required to perform and write up labs, and to keep a journal of assigned writings. Prerequisite: The studentmust have successfully completed Physical Science.

    Chemistry Honors DE (DE, Hon) 1 credit
    Grade 11
    The Chemistry Honors DE course is an honors level chemistry course. It deals with the composition, structure, and interactions of matter. Topics covered include measurement, classification schemes of matter, atomic structure, nuclear chemistry, electronic structure and periodicity, bonding/nomenclature of ionic and covalent compounds, molecular geometry, chemical equations, the mole concept, stoichiometry, intermolecular forces in solids and liquids, the gas laws, solutions, rates and equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, redox, and structure/nomenclature of saturated hydrocarbons. Students are required to perform laboratory experiments. This advanced course requires at least one hour (more in some cases) of study time outside of class for every hour spent in class. Prerequisite:  3.0 cumulative GPA; thestudent must have successfully completed Physics I Honors or be recommended by the science department.

    Physics AP (AP) ($95-$100 AP Exam fee required) 1 credit
    Grades 11-12 elective
    This course follows the AP Physics 1 (mechanics) course guidelines, and students take the AP Exam. The course builds upon concepts learned in Physics I Honors. Prerequisite: Physics I Honors or Chemistry Honors DE (with department approval).

    ELECTIVES
     
    Biology II Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grades 11-12 elective
    Biology is a broad and diverse discipline encompassing many areas of science including chemistry, ecology, genetics, botany, and more. This particular course is designed to focus on molecular and cellular mechanisms, genetics, and human body systems. These topics provide more in-depth study of topics covered in Biology I and introduce students to human anatomy and physiology and techniques in DNA technology. We consider how the Scriptures and science work together to engage and enlarge our understanding of living systems. The course is designed for the advanced science student. Prerequisite: Chemistry Honors DE (Chemistry CP students may be accepted with teacher approval). 

    Anatomy & Physiology (CP) 1 credit
    Grades 11-12 elective
    Human Anatomy and Physiology is a study of the structures and functions that allow for physical human life. Disease and disorder are covered, but the emphasis is on normal, healthy physical life. Levels of body organization and 11 different systems are studied. Each unit includes a discussion of how each system enhances our God-ordained relationships to Himself, others, and the rest of creation. The unit on human development is covered throughout the year following the main events on a weekly and monthly basis. Prerequisite: The student must have a B or higher in Chemistry or be enrolled in/have completed Chemistry Honors DE.

    Earth Science I and II (CP) 1/2 credit each  
    Grades 11-12 elective
    Earth Science I includes an in-depth look at the formation of Earth (the geosphere), as well as mechanical, physical, and chemical properties that allow the Earth to function. Various theories concerning the origin of the universe and the planet Earth are discussed, as well as the formation of the Earth from a biblical perspective and the student’s role as a steward of creation.

    Earth Science II further explores the geosphere and covers additional topics such as the atmosphere and meteorological events as well as a comprehensive overview of the Earth’s systems and their role in the Earth’s homeostasis. These courses include previous knowledge from Physical Science and Chemistry. Collaborative learning and hands-on instruction are key components. Earth Science I is a prerequisite for Earth Science II.

    Engineering Design Principles (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 10-12 elective
    Engineering Design Principles immerses students in the physics and design principles of engineering and emphasizes project-based learning. Study includes structural integrity, materials science, and elementary physics principles. Critical problem-solving skills are cultivated through engineering design challenges to teach students to think outside of typical boundaries and come up with creative and effective solutions. Prerequisite: Algebra I.

    Environmental Science (CP) 1/2 credit 
    Grades 11-12 elective (one-semester course)
    This one-semester course focuses on knowing our place in order to be better stewards of it. Its community engagement component regularly puts us outside, around town, and in the company of experts in the field. Specific science topics include: dendrology, water, food and farming, soil, and sustainability. In addition, the following cross-curricular threads are woven: theology, current events, history, nature journals, and significant personal reflection. Because engagement with creation is an emphasis of the class, it is designed with space to respond to seasonal or weather-related opportunities. Action projects are a key component to give students a chance to translate their learning into real-life work.
  • Biblical Studies

    Old Testament Survey I (CP)
    Grade 6 (one-semester course)
    The 6th grade Bible course is a required, semester-long Bible course. It deals primarily with the Old Testament and the redemptive story of the Bible as a whole. Topics covered are the Christocentric story of the Bible, the setting of the story, and the Old Testament from Creation through the Israelites’ wanderings in the wilderness. Students are required to participate in individual and class-wide examinations of the Bible along with a variety of discussions, assignments, and weekly memory verses. 

    Old Testament Survey II (CP)
    Grade 7 (one-semester course)
    The 7th grade Bible course is a required, semester-long Bible course. It deals primarily with the Old Testament and the redemptive story of the Bible as a whole. Topics covered are the Christocentric story of the Bible and the Old Testament from the Israelites’ wanderings in the wilderness to the Israelite monarchy. Students are required to participate in individual and class-wide examinations of the Bible along with a variety of discussions, assignments, and weekly memory verses. 

    New Testament Survey (CP)
    Grade 8 (one-semester course)
    The 8th grade Bible course is a required, semester-long Bible course. It deals primarily with the New Testament and continues the redemptive story of the Old Testament as fulfilled in Jesus Christ which began in the 6th and 7th grades. Within the Kingdom framework of Jesus Christ, this course emphasizes the themes of Leadership and Service as they are described particularly in the New Testament, and worked out in our relationships both in the church and to the world at large. 

    Biblical Foundations (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grade 9
    Bible 9 is a biblical foundations course which addresses the questions, “Who is God?” and, “What does it mean to be human?” In the first half of the course, students study the doctrine of the Trinity, God's attributes, and common errors in thinking about God. In the second half of the course, students study what it means to be created in God's image, how the Fall has marred that image, and why we need a Savior. God's purpose for work, his design for sexuality, and questions about marriage are also discussed in this course which lays a foundation for Christian doctrine and faith.

    Paul’s Epistles (CP) 1/2 credit                   
    Grade 10
    Students study Romans through Philemon, which are the books of the Bible written by Paul. While learning the major themes discussed in this part of the Bible, students also learn the unique Bible study skills necessary to study Paul’s epistles in an accurate way.

    General Epistles (CP) 1/2 credit                 
    Grade 11
    Students study James; Jude; 1 and 2 Peter; and 1, 2, and 3 John. While learning the major themes discussed in this part of the Bible, students also learn the unique Bible study skills necessary to study this part of the Bible in an accurate way.
     
    Senior Bible Seminar (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grade 12                                      
    In tandem with the Community Service Field Experience, this class is the capstone to students' CCS Bible curriculum education and experience. These courses are designed to engage students in discernment and exploration of central questions: “How is evil a problem for all of humanity, and which worldview has the best response to it? How does my response matter?” Students explore key concepts from the Old and New Testaments, Atheism, and World Religions. These formal studies provide a framework for the practical application students engage in during the Community Service Field Experience, which includes various onsite tours and volunteer work across Chattanooga. Students work purposefully to explore connections between the ideas they explore in Senior Bible Seminar and the activities they engage in during their Community Service Field Experience. These courses are united by the themes of the problem of evil, suffering, and brokenness in the world and our call to respond in service and ethical action. At times, students in both courses meet together. 

    Community Service Field Experience (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grade 12
    In tandem with the Senior Bible Seminar, this class is the capstone to students' CCS Bible curriculum education and experience. These courses are designed to engage students in discernment and exploration of central questions: “How is evil a problem for all of humanity, and which worldview has the best response to it? How does my response matter?” The field experience provides the hands-on application and experiential learning elements that engage students in purposeful work such that they are equipped to explore more deeply the ideas addressed in Senior Bible Seminar. These courses are united by the themes of the problem of evil, suffering, and brokenness in the world and our call to respond in service and ethical action. At times, students in both courses meet together.
  • Arts

    6th Grade Arts & Culture Orientation (CP)
    Grade 6 (one-semester course)
    Sixth Grade Arts & Culture Orientation offers each incoming 6th grader a breadth of experience in arts and culture. Over the course of one semester, each student rotates through Choir, Visual Art, Theatre, and Introduction to World Languages. The Arts & Culture Orientation course offers both current and incoming students the opportunity to discover where their arts emphasis will be for their 7th grade year and which language they will choose to study. Each rotation culminates in a final presentation of essential understandings gleaned from the previous 4 1/2 weeks of instruction. Sixth graders interested in Introduction to Introduction to Band may take that course as an elective in 6th grade; it is not part of the Arts & Culture Orientation. 
     
    MS Studio Art I (CP)
    Grades 7-8 (one-semester course)
    Students engage with 2D and 3D design problems dealing with foundational studies of the elements of art and principles of design. While this course is open to students in 7th and 8th grade, there is some thematic overlap with 7th grade Western Civilization as students engage artworks ranging from ancient Greece to the European Renaissance.
     
    MS Studio Art II (CP) 
    Grade 8 (one-semester course)
    Students produce a variety of artworks from ink drawings and relief prints, to landscape paintings inspired by 19th century American artists. A range of materials are used to make art using nature and animals as subject matter. This course engages in thematic integration with 8th grade US History and the American frontier and production of art that connects with the American West from 1800 to 1900. 

    Art Appreciation (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 9-12 elective 
    Art Appreciation is a great way for students to earn a fine arts credit while experiencing a hands-on introduction to the importance of art for everyone. Fundamentals of design and composition are investigated and applied as students develop their skills in the employment of the basic language of art and composition in a range of historical “hands-on” media. Students get to explore a variety of media but also learn about the cultural and historical significance of art and how it has impacted who we are as Americans in the 21st century.

    Design I (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 9-12 elective (one-semester course)
    For students interested in fine art, graphic design, architecture, industrial design, videography and beyond, Design I is the perfect introductory course. This semester class takes students on a rigorous design process, exploring both traditional and contemporary methods of art and design construction. Students are immersed in a generative process of creation by research methods, design thinking, and multimedia artistic applications. Design I is a prerequisite to Design II and leads toward an AP concentration in 2D and/or 3D design.

    Design II (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 10-12 elective (one-semester course)
    Design II takes students into a deeper creative process of design and media exploration by way of digital photography, graphic design, printmaking, and 3D fabrication. Students deepen their understanding of how art is a process that starts with an idea and is masterfully developed into a finished work. Prerequisite: Design I or Foundations of Art taken in the 2019-2020 school year or prior with teacher approval and signature. 
     
    Drawing I (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 9-12 elective (one-semester course)
    This semester class offers an introductory course in drawing and painting. Students learn the fundamentals of drawing from life through an investigation of the elements of art. Students engage in portrait studies, observational drawing, and studies in perspective and spatial concepts as well as rendering textures and values through a variety of media and mark-making. This class also explores the use of wet-media and color theory. Students are given a personal sketchbook for homework assignments throughout the semester.

    Drawing II (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 10-12 elective (one-semester course)
    This semester class offers students an array of design challenges in 2D media, specifically drawing and painting. Students learn classical approaches to life drawing, anatomy, portraiture, and figurative studies. Students will also get a foundational understanding of architectural perspective drawing and foreshortening as it relates to figurative work and landscape rendering in both dry and wet media. Students are given a personal sketchbook for homework assignments throughout the semester. Prerequisites: Drawing I and teacher recommendation.

    Drawing III (Hon) 1/2 credit
    Grades 10-12 elective 
    Drawing III is an honors drawing class aimed at preparing students for advanced drawing techniques and conceptual practice. Students will engage with experimental drawing practices with a variety of dry and wet media. Students will also explore an array of personal and cultural ideas through their work and the use of imaginative manipulation of materials and mark-making. The final 6 weeks will be dedicated to responding to investigative prompts and AP preparation. Prerequisites: Drawing II and teacher recommendation.
     
    Ceramics I (CP) 1/2 credit                                                           
    Grades 9-12 elective 
    Ceramics is physical problem-solving, thinking through cause and effect to construct basic forms with clay. Clay is different from other art mediums in that it requires an understanding of the three dimensional world. The aim of the Ceramics program is to help each student develop a personal style and individual expression using clay as their primary material. Both functional and sculptural approaches are taught. Ceramics students develop a working knowledge of the various techniques of the ceramic process including clay and glaze formulation, kiln firing, throwing on the potter’s wheel, and numerous methods of hand building. Open Studio provided for additional studio time outside of class. 

    Ceramics II (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 10-12 elective 
    Ceramics II offers a more rigorous, hands-on investigation of clay as a multifaceted medium with great expressive possibilities. This course structure allows students to utilize most forming techniques while further investigating functional pottery and sculptural formats for personal expression. Open Studio provided for additional studio time outside of class. Prerequisites: Ceramics I and teacher recommendation. 

    Ceramics III (Hon) 1/2 credit
    Grades 10-12 elective
    Ceramics III is an honors ceramics class aimed at students having the ability to respond to advanced prompts, leading toward rigorous investigation and dialogue in support of individual artistic development. Students are encouraged to take risks and reinvent personal processes through experimentation. The final 6 weeks are dedicated to learning how to articulate their ideas as well as visual presentation. Open Studio provided for additional studio time outside of class. Prerequisites: Ceramics II andteacher recommendation. 
     
    AP Art and Design (AP) ($95-$100 AP Exam fee required) 1 credit
    Grades 11-12
    The AP Art and Design program consists of three different courses and AP Portfolio Exams—AP 2D Art and Design, AP 3D Art and Design, and AP Drawing—corresponding to college and university foundations courses. Students may choose to submit any or all of the AP Portfolio Exams. Students create a portfolio of work to demonstrate inquiry through art and design and development of materials, processes, and ideas over the course of a year. Portfolios include works of art and design, process documentation, and written information about the work presented. In May, students submit portfolios for evaluation based on specific criteria, which include skillful synthesis of materials, processes, and ideas and sustained investigation through practice, experimentation, and revision, guided by questions. Homework and summer assignments required. Prerequisites: Level III art or design course and teacher recommendation.

    Concert Choir (CP) 
    Grades 7-8 (one-semester or full-year option)
    Students in Concert Choir learn to read and understand music as well as develop a higher level of choral musicianship in various styles and languages. The course prepares singers for more advanced levels of choral singing, advances their vocal range and production, and equips them to sing choral music in unison in two-, three-, and four-part harmonies. Choral repertoire includes sacred, popular, gospel, spirituals, and classical styles. Students use their talents to serve the Lord in concert, festival, ministry, and performance opportunities. The course is designed to help students grow in the grace and knowledge of Christ through the study of His creation of music and memorize significant portions of his Word through the means of sacred music.

    Chamber Singers (CP) 1/2 or 1 credit
    Grades 9-12 elective 
    This High School mixed choir is a performance-based class for students with an interest in singing developing their abilities. This course functions as preparation for Choral Ensemble or as a rich choral opportunity for students who are beginning their study of the choral arts. Students discuss and listen to singers/choirs of jazz, gospel, and classical musical idioms. Performance events include the winter and spring concerts, school assemblies, competition performances at a regional amusement park, area schools, and nursing homes. Singers also receive instruction in ear training, music fundamentals, sight-reading skills, and vocal production. 

    Choral Ensemble (CP) 1 credit
    Grades 10-12 elective
    Admittance to Choral Ensemble is by audition only and exists to provide our advanced singers an opportunity to sing a wide variety of choral literature in four-part or more harmony, with and without accompaniment. The course provides the opportunity to sing expressively from memory and perform authentically in different languages. The students develop skills in choral blend and balance, basic music theory, and sight-reading. The ensemble has opportunities to represent the school and our Lord through public performance in chapel services, regional and state choral festivals, winter and spring concerts, a concert tour, community civic events, TV appearances, and area churches, schools, and nursing homes. The class also helps prepare students to enjoy singing in college, church, and community choirs, and throughout life. (Additional fees: Interim trip $750; tuxedo/formal dress required.) Prerequisite:Audition; participation in Chamber Singers recommended.

    Introduction to Band (CP)
    Grades 6-8 elective (one-semester course)
    Introduction to Band is a semester class that develops beginning skills of instrumental study. Students should expect to purchase or rent their own instruments. Beginning students choose from flute, clarinet, trumpet, or trombone with their options expanding in subsequent bands. Introduction to Band has one performance at the end of the semester.
     
    Concert Band (CP) 1/2 or 1 credit
    Grades 7-9 elective 
    The CCS Concert Band is an auditioned group of students who have completed Introduction to Band or show proficiency in beginning to intermediate skills. They perform concerts of diverse musical selections for the Middle and High School as well as community events. Students may take this course for a semester or as a full-year option. 

    Advanced Ensemble (CP) 1/2 or 1 credit
    Grades 9-12
    Advanced Ensemble exists to provide our advanced musicians an opportunity to perform and develop skills in a wide variety of more advanced content. They are challenged to both understand music theory concepts and apply them to performances. Students may take this course for a semester or as a full-year option. The Advanced Ensemble performs for the football and basketball games as well as two after-school concerts per semester. Placement in either Advanced Ensemble or Jazz Band is by audition. 

    Jazz Band (CP) 1/2 or 1 credit
    Grades 9-12 
    The Jazz Band is an ensemble for instrumental or vocal students to develop skills in swing, rock, blues, and other forms of popular music. Students may take this course for a semester or as a full-year option. An emphasis is placed on improvisation. Spots are available for vocals, woodwinds, brass, bass guitar, electric guitar, piano, drum set, and mallets. Placement in either Advanced Ensemble or Jazz Band is by audition. 
     
    Guitar (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 9-12
    Guitar I prepares students for individual and ensemble guitar performance through reading music notation and chord accompaniment. Students are provided with a guitar in class, but practicing with a guitar at home is recommended. Students are challenged to perform a variety of styles including blues, rock, folk, and classical. 

    Ballroom Dance I (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 9-12 elective (may only count as .5 credit of the fine arts graduation requirement)
    This course introduces students to basic technique and steps in at least 5 different styles of ballroom. From this foundation, students develop the skills to learn, refine, and create choreography in preparation for the end of semester performance. This performance includes combinations learned in class as well as new choreography that incorporates style and creative flare. 

    Contemporary Dance (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 9-12 elective
    This course introduces students to the basic technique and movement of modern and jazz dance, with some elements of hip hop. Students learn how to properly warm up the body and demonstrate combinations that move across the floor. This course provides a strong emphasis on learning and performing contemporary choreography,  as well as learning how to develop the skills for creating it. Students demonstrate pieces of contemporary choreography in a performance at the end of the semester. 

    MS Theatre (CP)
    Grades 7-8 (one-semester course)
    Students in MS Theatre explore basic acting and technical skills. This semester course prepares young actors for participation in theatrical production and improvisation and equips them to develop imagination, movement, vocal skills, concentration, and focus. This course sets a foundation of exploration and delight for students interested in the performing arts. 

    Speech & Debate (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grade 8 elective (one-semester course)
    Speech & Debate explores a variety of public speaking and debate styles to prepare for speaking and presenting both in and out of the classroom. This semester course equips students to research, write, and deliver speeches through instruction and practice, all while seeking joy and creativity in their work.

    Theatre I (CP) 1/2 or 1 credit
    Grades 9-12 elective
    This course serves as an introduction to the dramatic arts, with basic acting and technical skills as the focus. In order to understand theatre as a whole, students participate in the many parts of theatrical production as actors, directors, writers, and audience members. This is accomplished through a series of class performances and out-of-class involvement in other theatrical opportunities. The primary focus is to approach acting from various angles in order to develop not only concentration and focus, but also imagination, movement, and vocal skills. This class enables students to express themselves on stage in a believable and truthful way and grow to be well-rounded theatre students.

    Theatre II (CP) 1/2 or 1 credit
    Grades 10-12
    The purpose of this course is to utilize the theatrical skills learned in Theatre I to produce a higher level of professionalism as actor, director, writer, and audience member. These students put on the High School spring play, advanced improvisation performances, and other scene work. Students may take this course repeatedly because it changes emphasis each semester; not only are the productions different each semester, but the focus on material changes as well. Individual semesters may emphasize accents, stage combat, stage makeup, directing, script-writing, scenic design, children's theatre, and radio plays. Future concentrations depend upon student interest and talents. Prerequisites: Theatre I and audition.

    ELECTIVES

    MS Industrial Arts I (CP)  
    Grades 7-8
    This course is an introductory course designed to bring students into a shop environment at an age-appropriate level. Units that are covered are designed to be hands-on, activity-oriented exercises which build students’ skill, knowledge, and understanding in the use of tools and building. General areas covered are drafting, woodworking, wood carving, and other craft areas.

    MS Industrial Arts II (CP)  
    Grade 8
    This course is a continuation of Industrial Arts I at an intermediate level. Students use more advanced tools and build more in-depth projects according to skill level. The focus of this class is to design (based upon a given number of options), build, and finish a functional piece of furniture. Students learn how to design and build a cutting board. Students are also introduced to CAD. PrerequisiteMS Industrial Arts I.

    HS Industrial Arts (CP) 1/2 or 1 credit
    Grades 9-12 elective                
    This course offers instruction in the fundamentals of industrial arts with a focus on woodworking at a High School level. Students learn shop safety, use of tools, and the finishing process. The focus of this class is to design, build, and finish a functional piece of furniture. The student and the instructor jointly choose a project based upon the student’s experience, interest, and the number of semesters he or she is in Industrial Arts that year. This is the first class where hardwoods are introduced. This does not satisfy the graduation requirements for fine arts.

    Advanced Woodworking (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 10-12 elective  (fine arts credit)
    This course offers students an advanced experience in woodworking. The focus of this class is to intentionally create pieces of marketable art. Students individually design, create, and market their craft. Students integrate materials such as wood, metal, leather, pottery, and stone. Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and two semesters of industrial arts. MS Industrial Arts II can fulfill one of those requirements.
  • World Language

    6th Grade Arts & Culture Orientation (CP)
    Grade 6 (one-semester course)
    Sixth Grade Arts & Culture Orientation offers each incoming 6th grader a breadth of experience in arts and culture. Over the course of one semester, each student rotates through Choir, Visual Art, Theatre, and Introduction to World Languages. The Arts & Culture Orientation course offers both current and incoming students the opportunity to discover where their arts emphasis will be for their 7th grade year and which language they will choose to study. Each rotation culminates in a final presentation of essential understandings gleaned from the previous 4 1/2 weeks of instruction. Sixth graders interested in Introduction to Introduction to Band may take that course as an elective in 6th grade; it is not part of the Arts & Culture Orientation. 

    Spanish I (CP) 1 credit
    Grades 7-12 (included on HS transcript for grade 8 but does not affect HS GPA for 8th graders; not included on HS transcript for grade 7)
    This course is an introduction to the Spanish language and culture. Through physical action, commands, and storytelling, students begin to assimilate the language in a natural way. The fundamentals of first-year Spanish grammar, cultural insights, and verbalizing without fear are emphasized. This course emphasizes reading, listening, writing, and speaking.
     
    Spanish II (CP) 1 credit
    Grades 8-12 (included on HS transcript for grade 8 but does not affect HS GPA for 8th graders)
    This course continues building on the foundation begun in Spanish I. It provides a more in-depth study of grammar as well as verb tenses, vocabulary, and idiomatic expressions that are used in conversations. The course also includes a study of Spanish-speaking culture. Students may be able to earn honors credit by pursuing more advanced coursework opportunities with teacher approval.
     
    Spanish III Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grades 10-12
    This course is for advanced language students and continues to build on the knowledge learned in Spanish I and II. Students become more skilled and comfortable at expressing themselves in Spanish. This course focuses on building fluency through reading and listening. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 

    Spanish IV Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grades 11-12
    Available to the advanced Spanish student, this class uses the knowledge base from the first three years of input and begins to focus on student output. Students gain confidence by not only understanding written and spoken Spanish, but by producing an understandable message; class is conducted almost exclusively in Spanish. Students continue to develop their language skills through conversation, reading, and discussion of authentic documents and readings on the history of Hispanic countries. Emphasis is on conversation, reading, and writing skills. Prerequisite:Teacher recommendation. 

    Spanish AP (AP) ($95-$100 AP Exam fee required) 1 credit
    Grade 12
    This course is taught completely in Spanish, and all coursework, without exception, is to be done in Spanish. Spanish AP provides students who have satisfactorily completed Spanish III and IV Honors with a learning experience equivalent to that of a third-year college conversation and grammar course. In addition to a rigorous, holistic review of tenses and vocabulary, the course is an intensive study of expression in Spanish, including idioms, registers of formality, and differences of denotation and connotation. Consistent with the standards established by the College Board, this course focuses on near-native mastery and refinement of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. In addition, upon completion of this course, students should demonstrate a high level of cultural literacy. Students are exposed to the world of literature and current events in Spanish-speaking countries through authentic materials. All students in the AP class participate in the College Board Spanish Language Advanced Placement Test. Prerequisite:Teacher recommendation. 

    French I (CP) 1 credit
    Grades 7-12 (included on HS transcript for grade 8 but does not affect HS GPA for 8th graders; not included on HS transcript for grade 7)
    A basic introduction to French: spoken, written, and heard. Beginning conversation includes vocabulary related to day-to-day activities and fundamental grammar. Culture and geography of French-speaking countries are also introduced. 
     
    French II (CP) 1 credit
    Grades 8-12
    A continuation of French I, with increased emphasis on conversation while looking more in-depth at the most common grammar concepts needed to communicate. Language skills are improved through conversation, novel reading, journal writing, and interpretation of authentic resources. Students may be able to earn honors credit by pursuing more advanced coursework opportunities with teacher approval.

    French III Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grades 10-12
    This course builds on what students learn in French I and II, introducing more authentic materials to push students towards fluency. Students read books and articles, listen to news reports, and participate in conversations in order to increase their mastery of the language and understanding of French-speaking cultures around the world. Prerequisite:Teacher recommendation.
     
    French IV Honors (Hon) 1 credit
    Grades 11-12
    This advanced French course is designed for the serious student of French who is ready to spend the class period with little or no English and to delve more deeply into French culture, literature, and language. Fluency is enhanced through projects, memorization of scripture and poetry, and discussion. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation.

    French AP (AP) ($95-$100 AP Exam fee required) 1 credit
    Grade 12
    This course is taught completely in French, and all coursework, without exception, is to be done in French. French AP provides students who have satisfactorily completed French III and IV Honors with a learning experience equivalent to that of a third-year college conversation and grammar course. In addition to a rigorous, holistic review of tenses and vocabulary, the course is an intensive study of expression in French, including idioms, registers of formality, and differences of denotation and connotation. Consistent with the standards established by the College Board, this course focuses on near-native mastery and refinement of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. In addition, upon completion of this course, students should demonstrate a high level of cultural literacy. Students are exposed to the world of literature and current events in French-speaking countries through authentic materials. All students in the AP class participate in the College Board French Language Advanced Placement Test. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 
  • Computer Science

    Computer Science 6 (CP)
    Grade 6
    This course emphasizes digital citizenship and Google Suite as well as Canvas navigation. Students learn to use Google Docs, Slides, Keep, and Sites, and are introduced to Forms and Sheets. They continue to work on keyboarding skills.
     
    Computer Science 7 (CP)
    Grade 7
    This course teaches more advanced Google Suite skills and introduces a variety of computer science principles. In this course students learn about how computer programs work in block-based programming platforms like Scratch and LEGO Mindstorms Robots. They will develop an understanding of variables, functions, and conditional statements that they can build on in future computer courses and other computational thinking endeavors. Keyboarding skills in 7th grade focus on characters and syntax used in programming.

    Computer Coding Essentials (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grade 8-12 elective
    In this course students learn to develop programs using the Python programming language. They learn to use simple data types, lists, conditional statements, dictionaries, functions, and classes to solve realistic programming challenges. By the end of the course, students will have written over 80 programs of progressively increasing difficulty. This is a good entry point for students who are motivated to learn to write programs and make computers work. It also serves as a good entry point for students who want to learn to program without learning more comprehensive computer programming principles.Prerequisite: C or higher in Computer 7. 

    Exploring Web Development (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 9-12 elective
    Students learn the fundamentals of web languages such as HTML, JavaScript, and CSS, and are introduced to Adobe Photoshop. 

    Introduction to Computer Science (CP) 1/2 credit   
    Grades 10-12 elective
    A foundation is laid to prepare students for the AP Computer Science Principles course. Students begin to learn to design and implement computer programs that solve problems relevant to today's society, including art, media, and engineering. Students are introduced to Java programming.

    Software Engineering (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 10-12 elective
    This course is designed to teach students how to develop applications, with the capability to bring their own ideas to life. The course starts by introducing students to iOS development tools, basic programming concepts, and industry best practices. Building on this foundation, students will follow a step-by-step curriculum, working through practical exercises, creating apps from scratch, and building the mindset of an app developer. Prerequisite: C or higher in Computer Coding Essentials or Exploring Web Development.

    Computer Science Principles AP (AP) 1 credit
    Grades 10-12 elective
    This course introduces students to the central ideas of computer science, inviting students to develop the computational thinking vital for success across multiple disciplines, fostering creativity and applying creative processes when developing computational artifacts. Students design and implement innovative solutions using an iterative process as do artists, writers, computer scientists, and engineers. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Science.
  • Physical Education

    Physical Education 6 (CP)
    Grade 6 (one-semester course)
    A required, one-semester course that encourages fitness and development of the body, psychomotor skills, and sports skills. Students also gain an understanding of sport, exercise, health, and safety. The course also focuses on developing positive social and emotional behavior while competing within the class.

    Physical Education 7 and 8 (CP)
    Grades 7-8
    This optional course continues the foundations and skills established in Physical Education 6, further encouraging fitness and development of the body, psychomotor skills, and sports skills. Students deepen their understanding of sport, exercise, health, and safety. The course also focuses on developing positive social and emotional behavior while competing within the class.
     
    Physical Education (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 9-10 (one-semester course)
    A one-semester activity course which introduces students to basic fitness and aerobic activity; includes team and individual sports.
     
    Wellness (CP) 1 credit                 
    Grade 9 (one-semester course)
    This required, one-semester 9th grade course is designed to give students a better understanding of modern health. Areas of content include emotional wellness, nutrition, physical fitness, sexuality, general safety, first aid, and disease control. More importantly, this course challenges students to apply their learned knowledge. Decision-making models are presented so that each student has the opportunity to learn how to make good, thoughtful decisions about their health.
      
    Strength and Conditioning (CP) 1/2 credit
    Physical Education for Athletes
    This course is designed to maintain or raise the level of basic strength and conditioning for athletes at Chattanooga Christian School. In order to perform at an elite level, athletes need to train on a regular basis to maintain fitness necessary to reach their full potential.
  • Additional Electives

    Personal Finance (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 11-12 elective
    This course introduces students to money-management related topics presented from a Christian perspective, for the purpose of better equipping students as they move out on their own and transition into college and adulthood. Sadly, Tennessee has led the USA in most bankruptcies (about 1 in 53 families) in 2006 and 2007. Money (or the mismanagement thereof) is a leading cause of marital stress and hardship. Topics include budgeting, investing, planning for retirement, resume writing, and job interviewing. Equipped with good money management principles, the goal is that students will make wise, biblically-based financial decisions. This course does not satisfy the graduation requirements for math.

    Microeconomics (DE) 1/2 credit
    Grades 11-12 elective
    A college-level introduction to the behavior of individual consumers and businesses. Topics include human motivation, the role of prices, perfect and imperfect competition, supply and demand, market outcomes, government intervention, and selected applications. Christian perspectives on the nature of mankind, market outcomes, the role of government, and the presuppositions of modern economic analysis will be explored. This course does not satisfy the graduation requirements for history.

    Entrepreneurship (CP) 1/2 credit
    Grades 11-12 elective (one-semester course)
    This one-semester course is a hands-on investigation of what it takes to start and operate a business. A study of entrepreneurs past and present provides inspiration as students develop their own business plans. Investment principles are also learned as we compete with other schools in the Stock Market Game. This course explores how business can glorify God and how entrepreneurship is being used today in the mission field. This course does not satisfy the graduation requirements for history.
     
    CCS Aide (CP) 1/4 credit 
    Grades 9-12 elective
    A one-semester or full-year elective credit allowing High School students to serve in a CCS classroom, office, or library. Students may assist with copying, grading, filing, doing computer data entry, maintaining bulletin boards, shelving books, preparing labs or other classroom activities, or tutoring. Students have a choice regarding the school or office in which to work.

    Yearbook (CP) 1 credit
    Grades 9-12 elective
    An elective course for all grade levels. Yearbook teaches the basics of book production and publishing, including professionalism, marketing and billing, taking photographs, designing pages, using graphics, interviewing, writing copy, editing, and discovering how books are assembled. Students learn responsible journalism as they develop concepts graphically and verbally. Students wishing to be on the yearbook staff must submit an application to the instructor. Teacher’s signature of approval is required. This course does not satisfy the graduation requirements for fine arts.

Academic Counselor Contacts